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product claims Tag

That Bites: “Aromaflage” Owner Settles False Advertising Claims

On May 3, 2018, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced that Mikey & Momo, Inc., owner of "Aromaflage" perfumes and scented candles, agreed to settle charges that it used deceptive claims to sell its alleged mosquito-repelling products. According the FTC, the products, marketed as "fragrance with function," lack any scientific evidence to support their insect-repellant claims. According to their marketing materials, the elegantly packaged products sold by several retailers including Dillard's, Overstock.com and Anthropologie, were "tested in the rice paddies of Southeast Asia as well as the finest locations in the Caribbean, Hamptons, and cottage country in the peak...

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Bounding into Trouble: Trampoline Review Sites Launch Brothers into FTC Investigation

Trampoline selling brothers, Sonny and Bobby Le, are prohibited from engaging in deceptive marketing practices after sending consumers to "independent" product review sites that were actually owned and operated by the brothers' company. According to the FTC complaint, the brothers advertised and sold Infinity and Olympus Pro trampolines through various websites. These e-commerce websites displayed logos and seals for the Bureau of Trampoline Review, Trampoline Safety of America, and Top Trampoline Review. As a result, consumers were led to believe that these review sites containing ratings based on safety and performance, were comprised of unbiased, expert reviews. In reality, these...

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Truth in Advertising Going to the Dogs?

Last week a class action lawsuit was filed in California against Ainsworth Pet Nutrition, the owners of Rachael Ray™ Nutrish® dog food products for, among other claims, negligent misrepresentation and violations of California's false advertising law and Consumer Legal Remedies Act. According to the complaint, the defendants engaged in deceptive labeling practices by marketing the food as "natural" and containing "no artificial preservatives." The ingredients at the center of the lawsuit are synthetic versions of vitamins B, C and K, as well as caramel color. Although not proven to be harmful, and present in animal and human foods, the ingredients...

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